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Cervical Screening

A cervical screening test (previously known as a smear test) is a method of detecting abnormal cells on the cervix.

Detecting and removing abnormal cervical cells can prevent cervical cancer.

Cervical screening isn't a test for cancer; it's a test to check the health of the cells of the cervix. Most women's test results show that everything is normal, but for around 1 in 20 women the test shows some abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix.

Most of these changes won't lead to cervical cancer and the cells may go back to normal on their own. However, in some cases, the abnormal cells need to be removed so they can't become cancerous.

About 3,000 cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed each year in the UK.

Screening

All women who are registered with a GP are invited for cervical screening:

  • aged 25 to 49  every three years
  • aged 50 to 64  every five years
  • over 65  only women who haven't been screened since age 50 or those who have recently had abnormal tests

Being screened regularly means any abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix can be identified at an early stage and, if necessary, treated to stop cancer developing.

Booking an appointment

When your screening is due you will receive a letter asking you to book an appointment with us. If you received a letter some time ago but did not attend screening then please contact us as soon as possible to book an appointment. To book your cervical screening appointment please call us on 02392 009191.

We offer appointments in the morning, afternoon and evening at different surgery locations across Portsmouth. You can attend the site of your choice.

Further information

Please visit the following links for further information about cervical screening.

Information leaflets available in multiple languages, click Here to view

Cervical Screening - Jo's Trust

More than skin deep



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